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  #21  
Old 01-04-2014, 11:13 AM
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Make sure that you research which way the clutch disc goes in before you install it and the transmission.
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  #22  
Old 01-04-2014, 12:11 PM
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These are all great tips! Another one I learned long ago is to smear some valve grinding compound on old rounded bolt heads and works especially well with rounded allen sockets. it takes up the slop and gives it bite with the socket to help remove.
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  #23  
Old 01-04-2014, 07:41 PM
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When I twist off the head of a bolt the most effective way I have found to remove the remaining thread is to weld a nut on the end of the broken off bolt. The bolt can then be removed with a normal wrench and the heat normally helps loosen the threads.

Great thread BTW!
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  #24  
Old 01-05-2014, 07:52 PM
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This method works great for removing broken LS manifold bolts. The other thing is that if the head is aluminum, you don't have to worry about your welds sticking to it.

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Originally Posted by TheJDMan View Post
When I twist off the head of a bolt the most effective way I have found to remove the remaining thread is to weld a nut on the end of the broken off bolt. The bolt can then be removed with a normal wrench and the heat normally helps loosen the threads.

Great thread BTW!
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  #25  
Old 01-26-2014, 08:44 PM
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If you ever lose a chuck key for a drill press use two small standard screwdrivers...insert one into the chuck key hole jse the other to engage the teeth of the chuck....switch it up to tighten or loosen
Ryan Austin
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  #26  
Old 02-02-2014, 12:03 PM
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Originally Posted by raustinss View Post
If you ever lose a chuck key for a drill press use two small standard screwdrivers...insert one into the chuck key hole jse the other to engage the teeth of the chuck....switch it up to tighten or loosen
Ryan Austin
Good tip in a pinch, but man, chucks are $8 at Lowes

When your sweeping up the shop, tape down the front of your dust pan. It keeps you from sweeping that last little bit back under the car.

Last edited by onelapduster; 02-02-2014 at 12:14 PM.
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  #27  
Old 02-03-2014, 12:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onelapduster View Post
Good tip in a pinch, but man, chucks are $8 at Lowes

When your sweeping up the shop, tape down the front of your dust pan. It keeps you from sweeping that last little bit back under the car.
Very true....but making sure you've got the right one is another thing
Ryan Austin
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  #28  
Old 02-20-2014, 07:48 PM
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Some of these items may sound persnickity but I spent many years in the OEM world and now in the custom world specializing in chasing gremlins so I am particular about how I like things to function and look.

Get in the habit of running your wiring through shrinkwrap. Not only does it help hold the wiring together while running it but you also now have shrinkwrap on your wiring to "finish" whatever sheathing you run... especially good with powerbraid. Comes in handy for injector wiring that is "pull to seat" that you can't just pop the connector off and never seems to be finished cleanly. If you don't run sheathing then now you've got nice shrinkable collars to hold your wiring together.


Anytime you take a cable (accel cable, parking brake cable, etc.. Lokar) out of the sheath shrink some shrink wrap over the end to keep it from unraveling. Same if you need to cut it... shrink wrap the area you are going to cut... cutoff wheel in the middle of the shrink wrap and it holds the strands together.

Get in the habit of dabbing anti-seize on any stainless hardware before you use it... especially if you are going to weld it. (I tack nuts to the backs of panels for mounting purposes so the components bolt down one handed) Stainless loves to gall and of course will seize on you at the worst possible time.

I guess after that one I should mention... Make everything boltable from one side of the panel!!! Pet peeve here... It's great that you've got your buddy, kids, or wife there to hold the wrench on the other side of the firewall right now but what about when you are on the side of the road or everyone is gone? Tack a nut to the backside of the panel or buy the tool to set threaded inserts. Build everything servicable because you are most likely the next person that will have to take that piece back off. Self tapping screws belong on metal buldings... not cars.

Adding on to that one as well... Make all components and individual harnesses removable. I deal with a lot of vehicles where components like the MSD box are hardwired into the car which is fine if it is never going to go bad... or have to be diagnosed... or have to be removed to access other components. Spend a few minutes to wire in connectors so that every component can be removed without having to take half the dashboard or wiring harness apart. When I wire EFI systems I run connectors to where they meet the vehicle harness so that if there is ever an issue I can remove the EFI system as a whole. I put connectors anywhere there may be a need to disconnect the wiring for any reason... I'd rather build it in now than end up cutting and splicing wires later. You can see in the pic below on this electronics panel for the current build I've even got connectors between the ISIS system and the XFI system in case I ever had to remove one or the other. (See my shrink wrap?!?! )


If you are taking the third member out of a 9" axle housing instead of fighting it on the ground trying to pry through the old RTV, hang the housing by the U-bolts from an engine hoist or vehicle hoist with jack stands just below the axle tubes. Now you can tap down on the housing with a heavy mallet and gravity does the hard work. Once the seal breaks, the axle housing rests on the stands leaving your third member hanging free.

Someone made mention of clutches earlier on... Never assume your aftermarket clutch hydraulics match the application height of your aftermarket clutch. After you dial in your bell housing (you always do that right?!? ) Check the height of your clutch fingers with your flywheel and clutch torqued in place. Measure that against the installed height of your clutch slave and make sure the throw of your slave matches the throw of your clutch pressure plate. Figure in a little for wear as well.. those fingers will move out as the disk wears.
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Last edited by Revved; 02-20-2014 at 08:06 PM.
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  #29  
Old 03-03-2014, 01:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GregWeld View Post
AND --- If you're going to weld on a gas tank…. Clean it with plain old soap and water --- and either fill it with ARGON or CO2 "inert" gas --- or drop some DRY ICE in it and wait for it to "smoke" before welding.
This is a great tip. People get hurt every year welding on tanks. If you don't have Argon or CO2 readily available dry ice is at most walmarts now.

I can see how the exhaust gas would work as well but you are trading an explosion hazard for a carbon monoxide hazard.
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  #30  
Old 03-03-2014, 01:20 PM
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When fabricating floors and firewalls and stuff. Save your templates! Not for the next car, but for when it comes back from paint you can transfer your templates to your favorite sound deadener and insulation and save a ton of time.
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