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Old 06-01-2014, 08:14 AM
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Default Racing SERVICE ITEMS for your car

Since some of us are actually using our cars on the track -- and we've recently had a discussion on Wheel Bearings and their service intervals. I found it timely that NorCal Shelby Club has just added some information for it's members about service items.


- Steel braided brake lines can degrade and should be regarded as replacement items. Look particularly at the ends for fraying where they enter the banjo fitting or tube into it. Run your fingers gently over the lines and feel for any fraying. Pro race teams replace these lines regularly, but since we run fewer events than them, we can get a bit longer service from them – but should still consider them replacement items.


- Wheels themselves, particularly OE wheels, are often overlooked during inspections, but have been found to have cracks in them. Wheels that are painted or powder coated need particular attention because those coatings may hide cracks initially, but will reveal them as rusty lines eventually. Yes, even aluminum and magnesium wheels will show a rusty like line of corrosion. The way to check your wheels is to wash them off really well, dry them, and then look them over really well under very good light. Think of what a blown up wheel could do to your weekend and then, with that thought in mind, inspect your wheels for any cracks or other defects.


- Watch aftermarket parts for cracks in welds. Many of us with Fox body Mustangs, for instance, have modified our suspensions by installing tubular front K members, light weight tubular front control arms, bumpsteer kits, rear torque arms, rear tubular control arms, rear panhard bars and much more. These parts all have some to many welds in them which can be overstressed by our large sticky tires and track use. Clean these parts off and check for weld cracks at the edges – and watch for telling rusty tracks in the paint! The OTEC team has had bumpsteer studs sheer, and found cracks in welds in all of these parts over the years – now admittedly we flog our cars quite hard on the track, but this exposes the weakness of products supposedly designed for the track.


- Tires. We know that tires are already on the list, but we have found that folks are not always inspecting their tires as closely as they should.


- Lug nuts and wheel studs. OTEC members have had lug nuts disappear and have had studs crack and fall off as a car cooled down in the paddock. Since we change tires more often than street cars and have the wheels off more often for inspections, we put more stretch/release cycles on the studs from tightening and removing the lug nuts. We all use studs made by ARP and encourage you to also. ARP makes their studs out of carefully designed and controlled alloys that deliver exceptionally strong and tough fasteners. Even ARP studs should be regarded as wear items in our sport and replaced every few years, along with the lug nuts.



- Heim joints/rod ends. If you use these, you should consider them to be service items. Inspect them, wiggle them, replace them if they have any play, and in any case replace them every 5 to 10 years just because.



- Brake caliper pads. While pads on street cars are often used until they are paper thin, pads used on track cars should be used if they are worn thinner than the backing plate of the pad. As we slow for corners during track sessions, we subject our track cars to exceptionally hard brake usage that results in heating rotors, calipers and pads far beyond the temperatures seen on the street and for much longer than even so-called “mountain driving” conditions.
We suggest that you add these items to your check list when preparing your car for an on-track event.
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Old 06-01-2014, 11:53 PM
dale68z dale68z is offline
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Thank you for the info. I do not have brake hoses as a maintenance item. What is your opinion, how many track days before replacement? Or, just replace if there is any loose braid?

What we do.

Every event the car goes on a lift, leaks checked, a very good visual inspection on the bottom of the car. I am all about preventive maintenance inspection.
Every other track day we pack/ inspect the front wheel bearings. Included is a very good inspection of pads and rotors. We also bleed the brakes every other event.
Every 4th event, the clutch fluid is bled. Typically we also change the engine oil and diff fluid.

Trans fluid always looks great, have only replaced it 1 time in 2 years.
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Old 06-03-2014, 10:12 PM
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Originally Posted by dale68z View Post
Thank you for the info. I do not have brake hoses as a maintenance item. What is your opinion, how many track days before replacement? Or, just replace if there is any loose braid?



I think they just need a good visual inspection and if you see anything suspect - then you replace them.


When you think about it - we're asking them to absorb heat -- remain flexible - and contain 1200 PSI of fluid pressures... I think I'm replacing the 4 on the Mustang this week just because.
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Old 06-03-2014, 10:33 PM
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Great post! I encourage inspection on your wheels, tires, studs after any racing event. A good cleaning of the wheels on the front and backside with a thin coat of wax will help brake dust from not sticking and embedding into the wheels.

Nut and bolt check is always a good idea on the underside of the car.

Buy a good torque wrench and air pressure guage as well!

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Old 06-04-2014, 02:12 AM
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Steel braided fuel lines go bad too, unless they are PTEF teflon

Also not a bad idea to check axles for twisting
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Old 06-04-2014, 07:27 AM
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Originally Posted by intocarss View Post
Steel braided fuel lines go bad too, unless they are PTEF teflon

Also not a bad idea to check axles for twisting



You can tell by the smell if they're not PTFE.... 'cause your garage will stink like gas.

There is specific compound braided hose for the "new" fuels... but if you have the old stuff then you have a stinky garage.
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Old 06-04-2014, 10:16 AM
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An often overlooked item under our cars to service is shocks. Those who are running aftermarket dampers, just because you payed a small fortune for your units, don't think that the oil and nitrogen doesn't require regular attention. Consult your dealer for estimated service intervals.
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Old 06-05-2014, 10:57 AM
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I'm told if you're running say a JRI shock and racing -- these need to be serviced annually

If you're running a RideTech --- then every couple years

I guess if it's a FOX - that would depend (as it does on all of the brands) what you're running and how you're using them.

At the end of August - I'll send in the Double adjustable Ohlins on the Lotus for a complete rebuild/service.
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